A Millennial Blog for All

Posts tagged ‘Millenial’

Millennials Turning on Obama

Check this out: Millennials are disenchanted with President Obama.

Not to sound like a cranky white guy (which I am), but it’s rightly so. Everything he campaigned on; everything he hoped the young generation would believe about him and his administration was a lie. Or perhaps the least truthful untruth.

As much as Gloria Borger, the author of this article, wants and wishes that Obama’s sanctioning of all sorts of eavesdropping to simply be an expression of his moderate attempt to play the middle ground between Republican love of defense and Democratic love of equality, it simply is not true. The Obama administration has, in fact, sanctioned ‘domestic spying.’

Image

http://politicalhumor.about.com/od/barackobama/ig/Barack-Obama-Cartoons/Obama-s-Second-Term.htm

It would appear that this, coupled with the anemic recovery, touted by nearly every liberal as ‘no small feat’, isn’t good enough for Millennials. My generation was willing to allow some leeway to a man we liked, but now that he has clearly overseen policies the majority of Americans, and Millennials, find reprehensible, it may have been the straw that broke the camel’s back.

But these numbers should not be terribly alarming to his administration, however. They only would be to those who believed that the 66% of Millennials who voted for the president represented a new Democratic majority in perpetuity. These people, who were not terribly rare the first few weeks after the most recent election, are either liars or fools. Probably both.

Back to the original article, Borger states: “Now, I know this president doesn’t like some parts of his job. He doesn’t much like schmoozing members of Congress, despite his recent share-a-meal plan with assorted Capitol Hill types. He doesn’t like the LBJ-style strong-arming, either. He doesn’t much like the messy lawmaking process in which personal relationships can often mean the difference between getting what you want and getting nothing at all. And he doesn’t ever like to be pushed. Ever. No-drama Obama, remember?”

Yeah, we remember. It makes us all pine for the days when we had a president who would schmooze. Who would strong-arm. Who would shake hands and move things around to get something done. Remember the movie Lincoln last year? The very reason Spielberg made that movie was to teach the Legislative and Executive branches a lesson in working together. That was what Abraham Lincoln did. Everything this president will not do. He has always been a disappointment to conservatives. He’s just become one to independents. And he’s becoming one to liberals. And to Millennials.

But, there is a silver lining in all of our president’s faults, according to Borger: “But he does like speeches. He likes writing them, redrafting them, pondering them. He likes giving them, too — because he’s good at it.”

That’s exactly what we need! A speech! That will make all of this better. The man who should have been a speechwriter will make everything better.

Unfortunately, the only tonic that will likely make this situation better is a cold glass of better leader.

When the theme song of the Millennial Generation is about buying junk at a thrift shop, you might not be doing enough.

Advertisements

Overqualified Yet Underprepared

If you had to do it all over again, you would have, said 53% of Millennials surveyed in the substantive information in this article by Jermaine Taylor: http://www.cnbc.com/id/100727466.
 
I’m one of them. I majored in philosophy at a small liberal arts school. Given the opportunity for a do-over, I would have double majored in philosophy and something that wasn’t in the humanities, like biology or economics. And I would have gone to a larger school. Hindsight is 20/20, but foresight is pretty laughable. 
 
I didn’t consider things like employment rates or the economy when I when to college. Colleges are pushing back against results driven data, which is laughable and outrageous considering the grievous disservice they have provided the majority of my generation, particularly in conjunction with the tremendous amounts of money we (actually, our parents) have poured into their institutions. The most of us are flying blind when we graduate. 
 
This “should be an alarming call to action for all of us,” said André Dua, a director at McKinsey & Co., and lead author of the study. “We need to have a national discussion about how to better prepare students.”
 
All attempts to right these wrongs, so far, have been Band-Aids on arterial wounds. In an ironic twist, the current administration appears hapless when faced with such uncertainty, much like many Millennials.
 
That’s why it’s such good news that Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL), Mark R. Warner (D-VA), and Ron Wyden (D-OR) for getting something started with the “Student Right to Know Before You Go” Act. It’s not a big enough gauze for that arterial wound I mentioned before, but it’s a promising start.

Arrested Development: The Millennial Story

We have yet another article on the near disaster that is the Millennial economy, written adroitly by Derek Thompson. You can read it here, and I suggest that you do:

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/04/the-unluckiest-generation-what-will-become-of-millennials/275336/

We’re putting it all off, folks. Marriage, kids, mortgages. All the things that were supposedly ‘The American Dream’ before now makes our skin crawl. Or, to be more egalitarian, it’s makes us nervous. Not because we hate these things, but because we are absolutely not ready for them. We don’t have enough money. We don’t have any satisfaction in our careers, should we be lucky enough to have one. (As you can likely tell from this blog and this post, I don’t have much of either.)

Image

A lot of us live with our parents. To quote Mr. Thompson, we are looked at as “Perma-Children,” and he makes the case for prolonged pessimism. He is correct that entertainment and other commodities have been greatly cheapened by the internet, but truthfully, who cares? It’s nice, but a good, independent, quality of life is nicer.

We are the unluckiest generation, economically speaking. We came into a workforce after the burst of the economic bubble that, in hindsight, was amazing in the sense that so few people saw it coming. Everything was either artificially too low or too high, and one day, it wouldn’t be able to maintain itself. The day has come and gone, and here we are.  

It’s the same narrative everywhere we go. Millennials are: The most educated generation. The least paid generation. We whine. We complain. We had great childhoods and our expectations were too high.

Valid points all. But no comfort is to be found. We are in the midst of a recovery, but it’s slow and anemic and one can’t help but feel as though the bottom could fall out from it at any moment. It’s tiresome.

We aren’t going to have as good as the Baby Boomers and Generation X. We know. We get. We won’t be able to make up the ratio of wealth. Perhaps it’s because the world is changing so rapidly that even we’re running to catch up.

There is, of course, optimism, but realism tends to get in the way.

A Response to Generation Screwed

A fascinating article was recently penned by Joel Kotkin for the Daily Beast the other day, called Generation Screwed. You can read it here:

http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2012/07/15/are-millennials-the-screwed-generation.html

His take is backed by sound numbers and good analysis. Those numbers and analyses suggest that the game is rigged against the Millennial generation by the Baby Boomers and Generation X. But not out of hubris or malice, but out of fear and stupidity.

The previous generations have taken what they could from what was offered without fear of the well running dry. Now, the well is running dry. Boomers aren’t retiring as early not, because all of a sudden, the money isn’t there to move to Boca Raton. And considering the palpable desperation frothing from the masses of 18-29 year olds looking for gainful employment, companies that are looking to hire new workers are low-balling Millennials

The Millennial reputation, oftentimes well earned, is that we are whiners, and who strut about with undeserved sense of accomplishment. Working with Millennials in a professional environment can be extraordinarily frustrating.

Millennials

In Ron Alsop’s The Trophy Kids Grow Up, he discusses the unusual precedents that our generation sets up for the workplace. We don’t like dressing up for work, and we don’t like our personalities infringed upon or stultified. We want flexible schedules, steady pay-raises, and a clear path up the corporate ladder. This rubs many in the business world the wrong way, and this is perhaps why many major companies are uncomfortable hiring us. But it’s a feeling they steadily have to get comfortable with. We are unavoidable, considering there are 90 million of us swarming the work force in segments, year after year.

There need to be new and clever ideas if we are to have it anywhere near as good as the previous generations have. There is a serious debate going on in Washington DC, and indeed, all over the world, on how to ensure that the wealth of nations does not dissipate taking care of generations who have grown used to spending without paying much back. We need to impose responsibility on those in power, and take that power away from those who refuse to be responsible.

Tag Cloud